• Welcome to Calthorpe Park School Library!

    The Library is run by Mrs Ward and a team of 10 Student Librarians.  It is open from 8.30 am until 3.30 pm including break and lunch time, for students of all year groups to browse, read, revise and do homework - and even play quiet games!

    In addition to fiction and information books, there is a newspaper, plus a range of magazines and DVDs for you to enjoy.

    Students are welcome to join our Book Group or participate in the varied activities that take place in here. Check out some of the other Library pages to find out more. 

    We look forward to seeing you in here soon!

    • How to Borrow Resources

      Students may borrow 2 books for two weeks and 1 DVD overnight (or for the weekend, of course!).

      All resources must be taken to the desk and students need to give their name to Mrs Ward or the Student Librarian on duty.  The book or DVD will be issued to them and stamped with the return date.

      There are no fines for late return, but reminder notices will be sent via your tutor group. You will not be able to borrow any more resources while you have an overdue book or DVD.  If the resource is not returned after 3 reminders, parents will be contacted and you will be asked to pay for a replacement.

      • Student Librarians

        A team of 10 Student Librarians help the Library to run smoothly every day.  They ensure that books are put back in the right place so other students can find them and run the issue desk at lunch break.  They also help with getting resources ready for the Library shelves and support school library events.

        When vacancies arise, they will be advertised around school and on the Moodle/  Students who would like to become a Student Librarian need to complete an application form and may be invited for an interview before they are accepted on to the team.

        The current team of Student Librarians is made up of the following students from Years 7- 9:

        Freya Adams, Zaara Ahmed, Austen Burnham, Keira Etherington-Smith, Izzy Ferrandez, Sean Fisher, Julia Ljunberg Larsson,Sabrina Mackie, Amelia MacBurnie, Sam Oxlade,

        • Hampshire Book Award

          The Hampshire Book Award is an annual activity for Year 8 students.  Students are asked to read a shortlist of 6 books and assess them against the 3 Es ( Enjoyment, Engagement and Enrichment) before voting for the winner.  In Year 9, the same students read a longlist of books and vote to help create the shortlist for the new Year 8s to read!

          The six shortlisted books for 2017 are:

          Genesis (River of Ink) by Helen Dennis - What if a teenage boy washed up on the banks of the River Thames, soaked to the skin and unable to explain who he is?  What if the only clue to the boy's identity is a sketch he made of a strange symbol?  Who would help him?  Who would hunt him?  Who is River Boy?
          When a mystery teenage boy emerges from the River Thames drenched, distressed and unable to remember anything about himself, he becomes the focus of worldwide media speculation. Unable to communicate, the River Boy is given paper and a pencil and begins to scribble.  Soon a symbol emerges, but the boy has no idea why he has drawn it even thought it's the only clue to the mystery of his identity...  As the boy begins to build a new life under a new name, the hunt for his real identity begins.  A hunt which will lead him on a dangerous QUEST that he has only one year to complete ...  Introducing the first in a thrilling new series packed with adventure: this book has an illustrated narrative running through it, helping readers to solve the mystery alongside the characters in the story.

          Bubble Boy by Stewart Foster - Amir is mad. He’s crazy. But the hospital wouldn’t let a crazy person in. They must have interviewed him and checked his qualifications. But maybe he didn’t even meet them? Maybe he hasn’t even come from India. He might have arrived on an alien spaceship and snuck in here in the middle of the night. 
          Eleven-year-old Joe can't remember a life outside of his hospital room, with its beeping machines and view of London's rooftops. His condition means he's not allowed outside, not even for a moment, and his few visitors risk bringing life-threatening germs inside his 'bubble'. But then someone new enters his world and changes it for ever.
          Bubble Boy is the story of how Joe spends his days, copes with his loneliness and frustrations, and looks - with superhero-style bravery, curiosity and hope - to a future without limits. Expect superheroes, super nurses and a few tears from this truly unique story.

          Rail Head by Phillip Reeve - The Great Network is a place of drones and androids, Hive Monks and Station Angels. The place of the thousand gates, where sentient trains criss-cross the galaxy in a heartbeat.  It is also a place of great dangers - especially for someone who rides the rails and rides his luck the way Zen Starling does.  Once Zen was just a petty thief, stealing to support his family and living by his wits. Now everything has changed. Zen is still a thief - but it could be that the key to the whole universe rests on finding out what else he is . . .  This is an epic story with huge scope and film rights have already been bought by Warner Brothers.

          Island by Nicky Singer - Urban teenager Cameron arrives on an uninhabited Arctic Island. He's prepared for ice and storms and, stripped of his smart technology, possibly boredom. But he's not prepared for 24-hour daylight and erupting graves! At first Cameron believes the explanations of his research scientist mother. But, as the island reveals itself to him, he begins to see, and hear, things that push him right to the edge of the possible. One of them is an Inuit girl. The other is a large white bear ...

          My Name's Not Friday by Jon Walter - Samuel's an educated boy. Been taught by a priest. He was never supposed to be a slave. He's a good boy too, thoughtful and kind. The type of boy who'd take the blame for something he didn't do, if it meant he could save his brother. So now they don't call him Samuel anymore. And the sound of guns is getting ever closer ...Jon Walter's second novel is a beautiful and moving story about the power of belief and the strength of the human spirit, set against the terrifying backdrop of the American Civil War.

          Night Vision by Ella West - In the dark, Viola sees things no one else does . . . until the night she sees something she shouldn't.  Viola was born with a genetic condition that makes sunlight deadly. In the dark of night, when most teenagers are tucked up in bed, Viola has the run of her parents' farm and the surrounding forest. She is used to seeing hidden things through her night-vision goggles, but one night she sees something that could get her into a whole lot of trouble . . . Viola has always believed she would be dead before she was 20, but now she must decide just how far she's willing to go to help her parents keep their beloved farm. Is it okay to steal from a thief? What if the thief might be a killer? And what if the killer threatens to come after her and her family? "Night Vision "is" a"heart-thumping thriller that will leave you breathless."

          HBA Meetings

          The discussion meetings for the Hampshire Book Award are in the Library at lunch time.  Participating students should arrive as promptly as possible and may eat their lunch in the Library.  Remember to bring your booklet with your scores for each book to the meeting.

          Thursday 27th April

          Tuesday 9th May

          Thursday 25th May

          Tuesday 6th June

          Thursday 22nd June

          Monday 3rd July

        • Carnegie Award

          Known as 'the Booker of the playground', the Carnegie medal recognises outstanding writing for children and young people.  Every year, a group of interested students read the books and meet to discuss their views and opinions.  We don't get to choose the winner but it's fun to read some challenging and thought-provoking books!

          The 2017 shortlisted books are:

          Sputnik's Guide to Life by Frank Cottrell Boyce - Age 8+

          The Blythes are a big, warm, rambunctious family who live on a small farm and sometimes foster children. Now Prez has come to live with them. But, though he seems cheerful and helpful, he never says a word.

          Then one day Prez answers the door to someone claiming to be his relative. This small, loud stranger carries a backpack, walks with a swagger and goes by the name of Sputnik.

          As Prez dithers on the doorstep, Sputnik strolls right past him and introduces himself to everyone in the household. Prez is amazed at the response. The family pat Sputnik on the head, call him a good boy and drop food into his mouth. It seems they all think Sputnik is a dog. It's only Prez who thinks otherwise.

          But Prez soon finds himself having to defend the family from the chaos and danger unleashed by Sputnik, as household items come to life - like a TV remote that fast-forwards people: 'Anyone can do it, it's just that people don't read the instructions properly'; and a toy lightsaber that entertains guests at a children's party, until one of them is nearly decapitated by it - and Prez is going to have to use his voice to explain himself.

          It turns out that Sputnik is writing a guidebook to Earth called Ten Things Worth Doing on Earth, and he takes Prez on a journey to discover just those ten things. Each adventure seems to take Prez nearer to the heart of the family he is being fostered by. But they also take him closer to the day that he is due to leave them forever . . .

          The Bone Sparrow by Zana Fraillon - Age 11+ 

          Born in a refugee camp, all Subhi knows of the world is that he's at least 19 fence diamonds high, the nice Jackets never stay long, and at night he dreams that the sea finds its way to his tent, bringing with it unusual treasures. And one day it brings him Jimmie.

          Carrying a notebook that she's unable to read and wearing a sparrow made out of bone around her neck - both talismans of her family's past and the mother she's lost - Jimmie strikes up an unlikely friendship with Subhi beyond the fence.

          As he reads aloud the tale of how Jimmie's family came to be, both children discover the importance of their own stories in writing their futures.

          The Smell of Other People's Houses by Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock - Age 13+

          Alaska, 1970: growing up here is like nowhere else.

          Ruth wants to be remembered by her grieving mother.
          Dora wishes she was invisible to her abusive father.
          Alyce is staying at home to please her parents.
          Hank is running away for the sake of his brothers.

          Four very different lives are about to become entangled. Because if we don't save each other, how can we begin to save ourselves?

          Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock's extraordinary, stunning debut is both moving, and deeply authentic. These intertwining stories of love, tragedy, wild luck, and salvation on the edge of America's Last Frontier introduce a writer of rare and wonderful talent.

          The Stars at Oktober Bend by Glenda Millard - Age12+

          Alice is fifteen, with hair as red as fire and skin as pale as bone, but something inside her is broken. She has a brain injury, the result of an assault. Manny was once a child soldier. He is sixteen and has lost all his family. When Manny first sees Alice, she is sitting on the rusty roof of her river house, looking like a carving on an old-fashioned ship, sailing through the stars. He has a poem in his pocket and he knows the words by heart. And he is sure that girl has written them. When Manny and Alice meet they find the beginnings of love and healing.

          Beck by Mal Peet and Meg Rosoff - 16+ (Restricted to Yr 10 and above)

          Both harrowing and life-affirming, the final novel from Carnegie Medal-winning author Mal Peet is the sweeping coming-of-age adventure of a mixed race boy transported to North America.

          Born from a street liaison between a poor young woman and an African soldier in the 1900s, Beck is soon orphaned and sent to the Catholic Brothers in Canada. Shipped to work on a farm, his escape takes him across the continent in a search for belonging. Enduring abuse and many hardships, Beck has times of comfort and encouragement, eventually finding Grace, the woman with whom he can finally forge his life and shape his destiny as a young man. A picaresque novel set during the Depression as experienced by a young black man, it depicts great pain but has an uplifting and inspiring conclusion.

          Rail Head by Phillip Reeve - Age12+

           The Great Network is a place of drones and androids, Hive Monks and Station Angels. The place of the thousand gates, where sentient trains criss-cross the galaxy in a heartbeat.  It is also a place of great dangers - especially for someone who rides the rails and rides his luck the way Zen Starling does.  Once Zen was just a petty thief, stealing to support his family and living by his wits. Now everything has changed. Zen is still a thief - but it could be that the key to the whole universe rests on finding out what else he is . . .  This is an epic story with huge scope and film rights have already been bought by Warner Brothers.

          Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys - Age 13+

           It's early 1945 and a group of people trek across Germany, bound together by their desperation to reach the ship that can take them away from the war-ravaged land. Four young people, each haunted by their own dark secret, narrate their unforgettable stories. Fans of The Book Thief or Helen Dunmore's The Siege will be totally absorbed.

          This inspirational novel is based on a true story from the Second World War. When the German ship the Wilhelm Gustloff was sunk in port in early 1945 it had over 9000 civilian refugees, including children, on board. Nearly all were drowned. Ruta Sepetys, acclaimed author of Between Shades of Grey, brilliantly imagines their story.

          Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk - Age 10 + 

          Annabelle has lived in Wolf Hollow all her life: a quiet place, still scarred by two world wars. But when cruel, manipulative Betty arrives in town, Annabelle's calm world is shattered, along with everything she's ever known about right and wrong.

          When Betty disappears, suspicion falls on strange, gentle loner Toby. As Wolf Hollow turns against him, and tensions quickly mount, Annabelle must do everything in her power to protect Toby - and to find Betty, before it is too late.

          Powerful, poignant and lyrical, Wolf Hollow is an unforgettable story.

          • Book Group

            Book Group meets after school on alternate Monday between 3 - 4 o'clock.  We discuss the books we've been reading  and have fun doing a variety of book-related activities.  Enthusiastic readers from all year groups are welcome to join us!

            Meeting dates for the Summer term are:

            Monday 24th April

            Monday 8th May

            Monday 22nd May

            Monday 5th June

            Monday 19th June

            Monday 3rd July

            Monday 17th July

            • Library Events

              • Writing Competitions

                Wannabe authors should check out these writing competitions to see if they can get their work in print.

                Henrietta Branford Writing Competition: Closing Date Saturday 22nd April

                Welcome To Wonderland Writing Competition: Closing Date Friday 7th April

                • Links to Resources